Kodak No.3-A Model B4 1909
Kodak No.3-A Model B4 1909

Antique Vintage Kodak Red Bellows Folding Camera No.3-A Model B4 1909. My Grandpa's camera

Voigtländer Bessa 1929
Voigtländer Bessa 1929

Voigtländer Bessa (1929). This is the FIRST of a multitude of Bessas from the company. Folding bellows style camera has a brilliant viewfinder which is mounted on the shutter & lens assembly and tilts 90 degrees for landscape shots.  It is fitted with a Voigtar an f7.7, the first of four lens options (in increasing quality), Voigtar, Vaskar, Skopar, and the Color Skopar.  Three indicated focusing options, Landschaft, Gruppe, Portrait (Landscape, Group, Portrait) and 3 distance indicators (0-3, 2-3, 8-infinity in meters). 3 shutter speeds, 1/25, 1/50, 1/100 with ‘B’ and ‘T’. There were also three leaf shutter options (also in increasing quality), Prontor, Compur, Compur Rapid.

Rollieflex, 1938
Rollieflex, 1938
Kodak 35
Kodak 35

1949 gear coupled RF Kodak 35 with an Anastar Special f/3.5 50mm Flash Kodamatic Shutter.
The Kodak 35 Rangefinder is an improved version of the Kodak 35 that was launched by the Eastman Kodak Company in 1938 as their first 35mm camera manufactured in the USA. After two years, they improved the Kodak 35 camera, with a new superstructure housing containing a viewfinder and a separate rangefinder, but without any addition to the identifying inscription on the body. It is generally referred to as the Kodak 35 Rangefinder model. The gear coupled RF version due to the conspicuously placed gear next to the lens front element. 

Voigtländer Vitomatic IIb
Voigtländer Vitomatic IIb
Exakta-VX-500.png
Kodak Brownie Holiday Flash
Kodak Brownie Holiday Flash

The Kodak Brownie Holiday Flash is a small, simple viewfinder camera for 127 film made of Bakelite by Kodak based on the Brownie Bullet and designed by Arthur H Crapsey. This popular Brownie series has a moulded brown and tan plastic body with an optical direct vision finder. The Holiday Flash (with the Dakon lens) was sold from 1954-1962. I just happened to find two rolls of 127 film in the box )expired in 1970 & 71!) 

Imperial Mark XII Flash
Imperial Mark XII Flash

The Imperial Mark XII Flash was made in Chicago by Herbert George. It took 6x6 images on 620 film.  The design is very basic, having a fixed-focus, one shutter speed and a single aperture, although it was -of course - available with a flash unit. 

Kodak Brownie Starflash
Kodak Brownie Starflash

The Kodak Brownie Starflash was one of the Kodak Brownie Star series, made from 1957-1965 in the US and France, featuring a large built-in flashgun.
Made in black in the US from March 1957-June 1965, in red from March 1958 - October 1960, in white from March 1958- August 1962, and in blue from March 1958-Feb 1962. There was a special two-tone version with a Coca-Cola logo from October 1959-December 1961.

The original design was by Arthur H Crapsey. All were based on a similar layout: the film spools and a light baffle were mounted on a floor, which carried the advancing knob and a latch; the rest of the camera dropped down over this floor/spool assembly. Each model had various combinations of different viewfinder and flash arrangements - some built-in, some external, some with no flash facility. 

Nikon SLR F2 Photomic A
Nikon SLR F2 Photomic A

Nikon F2 is a 35mm film professional, mechanical shutter SLR system camera by manufactured by Nippon Kogaku K. K., Japan (Nikon Corporation since 1988), introduced in 1971 using Nikon F mount for interchangeable lenses. It is the successor of successful Nikon F. Instead of an upgrade of Nikon F it is a completely new body only sharing with its predecessor the lenses, some accessories and the philosophy.

This one is the F2 Photomic A
With finder DP-11, which is the auto-indexing version of DP-1. An auto-indexing finder does not need the lens prong to indicate the aperture setting. Shown with the Nikkor 50mm 1.4 lens.

Nikon FE2
Nikon FE2
Mamiya 645
Mamiya 645
Kodak No.3-A Model B4 1909
Voigtländer Bessa 1929
Rollieflex, 1938
Kodak 35
Voigtländer Vitomatic IIb
Exakta-VX-500.png
Kodak Brownie Holiday Flash
Imperial Mark XII Flash
Kodak Brownie Starflash
Nikon SLR F2 Photomic A
Nikon FE2
Mamiya 645
Kodak No.3-A Model B4 1909

Antique Vintage Kodak Red Bellows Folding Camera No.3-A Model B4 1909. My Grandpa's camera

Voigtländer Bessa 1929

Voigtländer Bessa (1929). This is the FIRST of a multitude of Bessas from the company. Folding bellows style camera has a brilliant viewfinder which is mounted on the shutter & lens assembly and tilts 90 degrees for landscape shots.  It is fitted with a Voigtar an f7.7, the first of four lens options (in increasing quality), Voigtar, Vaskar, Skopar, and the Color Skopar.  Three indicated focusing options, Landschaft, Gruppe, Portrait (Landscape, Group, Portrait) and 3 distance indicators (0-3, 2-3, 8-infinity in meters). 3 shutter speeds, 1/25, 1/50, 1/100 with ‘B’ and ‘T’. There were also three leaf shutter options (also in increasing quality), Prontor, Compur, Compur Rapid.

Rollieflex, 1938
Kodak 35

1949 gear coupled RF Kodak 35 with an Anastar Special f/3.5 50mm Flash Kodamatic Shutter.
The Kodak 35 Rangefinder is an improved version of the Kodak 35 that was launched by the Eastman Kodak Company in 1938 as their first 35mm camera manufactured in the USA. After two years, they improved the Kodak 35 camera, with a new superstructure housing containing a viewfinder and a separate rangefinder, but without any addition to the identifying inscription on the body. It is generally referred to as the Kodak 35 Rangefinder model. The gear coupled RF version due to the conspicuously placed gear next to the lens front element. 

Voigtländer Vitomatic IIb
Kodak Brownie Holiday Flash

The Kodak Brownie Holiday Flash is a small, simple viewfinder camera for 127 film made of Bakelite by Kodak based on the Brownie Bullet and designed by Arthur H Crapsey. This popular Brownie series has a moulded brown and tan plastic body with an optical direct vision finder. The Holiday Flash (with the Dakon lens) was sold from 1954-1962. I just happened to find two rolls of 127 film in the box )expired in 1970 & 71!) 

Imperial Mark XII Flash

The Imperial Mark XII Flash was made in Chicago by Herbert George. It took 6x6 images on 620 film.  The design is very basic, having a fixed-focus, one shutter speed and a single aperture, although it was -of course - available with a flash unit. 

Kodak Brownie Starflash

The Kodak Brownie Starflash was one of the Kodak Brownie Star series, made from 1957-1965 in the US and France, featuring a large built-in flashgun.
Made in black in the US from March 1957-June 1965, in red from March 1958 - October 1960, in white from March 1958- August 1962, and in blue from March 1958-Feb 1962. There was a special two-tone version with a Coca-Cola logo from October 1959-December 1961.

The original design was by Arthur H Crapsey. All were based on a similar layout: the film spools and a light baffle were mounted on a floor, which carried the advancing knob and a latch; the rest of the camera dropped down over this floor/spool assembly. Each model had various combinations of different viewfinder and flash arrangements - some built-in, some external, some with no flash facility. 

Nikon SLR F2 Photomic A

Nikon F2 is a 35mm film professional, mechanical shutter SLR system camera by manufactured by Nippon Kogaku K. K., Japan (Nikon Corporation since 1988), introduced in 1971 using Nikon F mount for interchangeable lenses. It is the successor of successful Nikon F. Instead of an upgrade of Nikon F it is a completely new body only sharing with its predecessor the lenses, some accessories and the philosophy.

This one is the F2 Photomic A
With finder DP-11, which is the auto-indexing version of DP-1. An auto-indexing finder does not need the lens prong to indicate the aperture setting. Shown with the Nikkor 50mm 1.4 lens.

Nikon FE2
Mamiya 645
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